What Chapter sub-types are available to Chapter Organizers?

Professional Chapter Organizers can form the following types of Chapters:

  • General Interest/Geographic – Chapter Organizers want to attract as many computing professionals as possible in the same geographic area. It is likely that many different technical and professional areas will be addressed.
  • Computing Topic – Chapter Organizers are interested in addressing specific technical and/or professional topics with computing professionals in the same geographic areas.
  • Industry – Chapter Organizers want to address the technical and professional needs of computing professionals in a specific industry, e.g., healthcare, entertainment, financial, etc.  
  • Job Function – Chapter Organizers want to address the technical and professional needs of computing professionals who perform a similar job function, e.g., software testers, software developers, etc.
  • Company – Chapter Organizers want to address the technical and professional needs of computing professionals centered within a company.
  • ACM Special Interest Group – Chapter Organizers want to address the technical and professional needs of computing professionals interested in an area covered by one of ACM’S Special Interest Groups, e.g, SIGGRAPH, SIGCHI, SIGMOBILE, etc.  
  • ACM-W (Women’s Group) – Chapter Organizers want to specifically address the technical and professional needs of women in computing, and ally themselves with ACM’s Council on Women in Computing. 

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